Details

Project TitleSelective Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibitors for the Treatment of Human Melanoma
Track Code2010-163
Short Description

Novel compound that inhibits nitric oxide synthase, a key oxidative stress mediator in human melanoma.

#diagnostic #cancer #therapeutics

Abstract

UV radiation exposure, especially sunburn at a young age, is commonly linked to melanoma incidence. As an important environmental carcinogen, UV radiation not only generates reactive oxygen species but also produces a large amount of nitric oxide (NO) in human skin.  Upon NO stress by the NO donor DETA, both melanoma proliferation and invasion potential are both significantly stimulated.  Northwestern researchers have identified a neural NO synthase (nNOS) that demonstrates an important role in generating NO and mediating NO stress in human melanoma.  They have studied the effects on nNOS in vitro cell culture and in vivo human biopsy studies.  More interestingly, they discovered that an induction of nNOS was evident with UVB radiation and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) incubation. Conversely, knockdown of nNOS with siRNA efficiently reduced the DETA-induced melanoma proliferation and invasion potential.  A novel synthesized nNOS inhibitor, JI-11, has been identified to inhibit nNOS activity.  Results show that co-treatment with JI-11 significantly attenuated the alterations induced by UVB radiation and DETA treatments.  These studies represent an innovative and promising strategy for melanoma prevention.

 
TagsTHERAPEUTICS: cancer, DIAGNOSTIC: cancer
 
Posted DateMar 12, 2013 11:34 AM

Inventor(s)

Haitao Mark Ji
Frank L Meyskens, Jr.
Thomas L. Poulos

Richard B. Silverman *

Fengtian Xue

Sun Yang

Applications

  • Diagnosis of melanoma proliferation
  • Strategy for melanoma prevention

Advantages

  • New means of diagnosis
  • Potential melanoma prophylactic

Publications

IP Status

A patent application has been filed.

Contact Information

Vara Josyula, PhD
Invention Manager  
(p) 847.491.4456

(e) vara.josyula@northwestern.edu